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Monday, July 4th, 2011 10:18 pm

Link to The Authoritarians (a free eBook) or Amazon.com The Authoritarians

I stumbled on to this book on the recommendation of a friend, I read it and was impressed with the conclusions it draws, In my lifetime I have seen a dramatic shift toward the right in the Republican party, the GOP is no longer a big tent, at best its several smaller tents with connected awnings, with no room left for people like me, whom are social liberals, but at times fiscally conservative.

In reading this book, I was able to recognize traits of RWA's in people around me. For example, I know several people who suffer from the extreme compartmentalization a Mormon scientist, who can both hold the semi creationist doctrine of the LDS Church and work on study of the solar system, this contradiction alone make my head want to explode.

I also have several friends, who while being actively gay, are also Neoconservatives and see no issue with their personal needs for equal rights, and the party's call for in some cases recriminalization of homosexuality.

I believe that in the end RWA's are not bad or evil, but their recent prevalence does explain the extreme lack of elasticity in politics in the Unites States over the last decade and some of the seemingly contrary positions held by the Republican party on whole.

(if you think anyone mentioned in this entry is you, your wrong, both people mentioned are composites of several people)

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 02:53 pm (UTC)
"Rules for Radicals" pretty much describes a lot of what is going on with social movements, in particularly on the Left. And it was the book that Obama taught out of while he had his professorship prior to getting into politics.

In a nutshell, RfR spells out that community organizers, otherwise known as aggitators, role is to build up a group or collection of groups, work them up into a lather and then direct them towards a particular target to "change" something that is said to be the goal. It really starts to take a darker tone when it describes how the people are to be kept angry and never improving their position in life, and the phrase "revolution for the sake of revoltution" is the real goal of any community organizer.
Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 04:18 pm (UTC)
This is exactly what the Tea Party is doing.

There is a fundamental difference though, the ideas for change the Republicans are spouting is very new and different (with some of the same ol') from their past rhetoric.

The stuff Obama is spouting, every Democratic president since Roosevelt has proposed.

I still contend, that while the Democrats have moved slightly further left (Obama is closer to Truman politically then anyone) the Republican base is much much much further right then any other Republican President in history, and when the base moves, so does the party.

I guess what I'm trying to grok is why the base has moved so much on the Republican side. Its really unclear to me.
Edited 2011-07-05 04:27 pm (UTC)
Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 05:35 pm (UTC)
Actually, that is not what the Tea Party is doing, they are not using violence, threats, extortion, etc to make the changes they are wanting to make.

To borrow a paragragh from wikipedia, and I quote:

Outlining his strategy in organizing, Alinsky writes:
There's another reason for working inside the system. Dostoevski said that taking a new step is what people fear most. Any revolutionary change must be preceded by a passive, affirmative, non-challenging attitude toward change among the mass of our people. They must feel so frustrated, so defeated, so lost, so futureless in the prevailing system that they are willing to let go of the past and change the future. This acceptance is the reformation essential to any revolution. To bring on this reformation requires that the organizer work inside the system, among not only the middle class but the 40 per cent of American families – more than seventy million people – whose income range from $5,000 to $10,000 a year [in 1971]. They cannot be dismissed by labeling them blue collar or hard hat. They will not continue to be relatively passive and slightly challenging. If we fail to communicate with them, if we don't encourage them to form alliances with us, they will move to the right. Maybe they will anyway, but let's not let it happen by default.

Tuesday, July 5th, 2011 06:05 pm (UTC)
Historically, most polls have shown that people do associate with conservative issues. So that is not really much of a surprise.